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Healthy Eating

TV & Radio, Gardening, Who's Who, etc.
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Re: Healthy Eating

Postby Earthmaiden » Thu Oct 01, 2020 2:44 pm

I've got a relative who bought one when Lakeland first started doing them. She's on her second one now and loves it.

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Re: Healthy Eating

Postby WWordsworth » Sat Oct 03, 2020 8:31 pm

Havent heard the term "heat island" since geography lessons at school, but I remember the meaning.

I grew up on the north west coast of England.
We also saw very little snow, and what we did get never lasted.
The first time I saw snow in a built up area was when I moved to Sheffield as a student.

Another fact I remember is that Edinburgh is further west than Bristol.

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Re: Healthy Eating

Postby karadekoolaid » Sun Oct 04, 2020 12:08 am

Geography.
I failed my O level. :gonzo :gonzo

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Re: Healthy Eating

Postby jeral » Sun Oct 04, 2020 1:51 am

WWordsworth wrote:...
Another fact I remember is that Edinburgh is further west than Bristol.

Not what you'd think, but true. Geography has a lot of what seem like trick questions doesn't it?

dennispc re apple compote: Can I suggest chopped dates instead of sultanas during cooking and maybe a couple of drained tinned apricot halves as well? Both are supersweet to me, although granted it wouldn't exactly be an apple compote then.

I was wondering about agave nectar (aka syrup), but don't know if processed high fructose would be good or bad for you versus sugar.

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Re: Healthy Eating

Postby jeral » Sun Oct 04, 2020 1:53 am

karadekoolaid wrote:Geography.
I failed my O level. :gonzo :gonzo

I managed not to know on checking recently what I thought the highest points in London were. Not good considering how long I've lived here, doh.

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Re: Healthy Eating

Postby dennispc » Sun Oct 04, 2020 1:25 pm

Geography I passed and history. Had to stay on another year to pass English Language as well as shorthand and typing. Never did pass maths.

Thanks for your ideas Jeral. This morning's effort had tbs dark brown sugar, two dessert apples, more sultanas, quarter tsp cinnamon and three cloves. Next I'll reduce sugar, but try dates which we both like.

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Re: Healthy Eating

Postby KeenCook2 » Mon Oct 12, 2020 10:35 pm

I just watched the C4 Dispatches programme on US food.

I realise that we have different rules and regs re antibiotics, pesticides etc. I also know that poor practices must certainly exist here - I'm sure we aren't snow white!

But what I wonder is how much worse are the US farming practices that were shown on the programme when compared with what goes on at the farms that supply the very cheapest meat and poultry here?
I hadn't seen megafarms for pigs and cows like the ones we saw, although I've seen intensive chicken farms on TV, never in real life.

Then at the end they said that the numbers of megafarms here are increasing all the time, too.

I was also quite shocked at the level of pesticides etc that remains in fruit and vegetables - in the US.

I'm not trying to start a discussion about the pros and cons of intensive farming etc, but I suppose what I'm trying to find out is how much of farming here would be just as distressing?

Sorry, I know that this probably didn't come as a surprise to an awful lot of you. Maybe I'm just a naive townie :oops: :oops:

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Re: Healthy Eating

Postby jeral » Tue Oct 13, 2020 3:34 am

KeenCook2 wrote:...[clip]...
I'm not trying to start a discussion about the pros and cons of intensive farming etc, but I suppose what I'm trying to find out is how much of farming here would be just as distressing?
...

Film crews have shown here and everywhere that "we the public" are allowed only to see what the owners want to be seen, which might be all, some (good bits at good times), or none at all if they know "we" wouldn't like it.

How long is a piece of string? Written standards are usually the minimums that are classed as "Good", and the UK's are better than the EU's in several areas.

Do all farms and processing plants actually comply? Who knows. Checks carried out in the UK and no doubt elsewhere are few and far between by either certifying associations or local authorities, yet all producers/suppliers can proudly display a logo having first self-certified as complying. Jolly good.

The fact is that we can't all eat meat "hand-reared from the hillsides". If we could, factory farms to feed the masses would have been unnecessary. Yes, there's a profit element as there has to be, but the demand for food and cheap food in growing populations everywhere is the main driver.

In the UK, home energy bill costs, low wages etc, have reduced available money for food, so cheap(er) food is demanded and corners will inevitably be being cut to provide it. What do we expect if it's food or no food?

Where the standards line is, or will be, drawn after Brexit both in the UK and for imports is unknown as yet. We wait with baited breath.

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Re: Healthy Eating

Postby scullion » Tue Oct 13, 2020 10:46 am

jeral wrote:In the UK, home energy bill costs, low wages etc, have reduced available money for food, so cheap(er) food is demanded and corners will inevitably be being cut to provide it. What do we expect if it's food or no food?


don't think that's strictly true.
in general, we now spend a far smaller percentage of income on food than we did in the past and have more disposable income to spend on other, 'luxury' stuff, and eating out.
we also now keep our homes at a higher temperature than we did in the mid twentieth century (that's possibly what increases energy bills).
wanting to spend less on food pushes standards down on processed food, and money down for farmers - who then have to make savings...

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Re: Healthy Eating

Postby jeral » Tue Oct 13, 2020 12:34 pm

Disposable income for most people has gone down, evidenced by wages being the same as at least ten years ago for Joe Average whilst everything else has gone up. The fact is that many cannot afford luxury goods without scrimping elsewhere, although the expectation of cheap food could be largely due to supermarket trade wars.

The bullying of farmers on price but also unfair practices, such as not allowing them to sell excess to others or contracting to buy up a season's stock then skipping out because they've found a cheaper source, are unquestionably wrong, but what can you do? Which government will pass laws that make food dearer? Or if Tories, upset their major party funding donors.

I do wonder how many armchair critics of a possible fall in standards are also those who'll always buy the cheapest food wherever it's from and irrespective. That's aside from those who can't even see animals other than as a product thus with no rights to welfare.

Welfare of calves exported live was what put me off meat decades ago, yet it's still allowed within the hypocritical EU (Council Regulation (EC) 1/2005). I sign animal welfare petitions without hesitation, for all the good it does when capitalism (supply/demand/profit) is in control. Sigh.

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