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Seasonal treats

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Re: Seasonal treats

Postby Renee » Tue Sep 01, 2020 10:05 am

I don't remember having roast chicken when I was a child. It was either roast beef, roast pork or roast lamb occasionally. I used to love leftover Yorkshire pudding with golden syrup. The Christmas meal was always at my grandparents house which used to alternate between turkey and goose. I used to help grandma to make the herb stuffing. Grandma used to cook roast veal occasionally. When I had a family at home, turkey was always special for Christmas and I loved all the preparation, making the stock early and freezing it. The day before Christmas I made the herb stuffing and a sausagemeat, onion and celery stuffing too, which went in the neck of the turkey. Happy days!

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Re: Seasonal treats

Postby Badger's Mate » Tue Sep 01, 2020 10:31 am

We had Stone's ginger wine at Christmas, Dad liked a whisky mac. Also we would have Advocaat and cherry brandy plus sherry. Not real sherry of course, but Emva Cream from Cyprus. These drinks were all deemed suitable for a small child...

Family history has it that Granddad spent five pounds, which would have been a significant chunk of his savings, on a turkey for Christmas, the first time he got all his boys home after the war. It became a tradition for the lads to go to Smithfield on the afternoon of Christmas eve and buy a turkey as they were being sold off, a sort of RTC I suppose.

I guess I'm just of the age (born a few years after rationing) that I was a child when an ordinary family who liked their food could afford poultry on a regular basis. We had turkey at Christmas until 1971, after which it was goose every year.

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Re: Seasonal treats

Postby Uschi » Tue Sep 01, 2020 11:45 am

For Germans white asparagus in spring is one of the seasonal holy grails. The rest of the world can't quite fathom out why, but hey ...

At the moment young sparkling wine that hasn't quite fermented is sold in bottles with caps that don't fit quite tight and allow the gas to escape. It is enjoyed cool with a hot slice of tarte à l'oignon Alsacienne or its German cousin "onion cake". I really love that.

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Re: Seasonal treats

Postby KeenCook2 » Tue Sep 01, 2020 1:12 pm

Renee wrote:I used to love leftover Yorkshire pudding with golden syrup.

You and me both, Renee :yum It was such a treat.
As were pancakes on Shrove Tuesday with lemon juice made from tartaric acid and sugar.

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Re: Seasonal treats

Postby karadekoolaid » Tue Sep 01, 2020 1:59 pm

THAT´S the stuff - Stone´s Ginger Wine!
And the dates in an oblong box, and bags of walnuts and hazelnuts.

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Re: Seasonal treats

Postby Badger's Mate » Tue Sep 01, 2020 2:51 pm

I love the asparagus season. We gorge on the stuff for a few weeks then don't eat it again for nearly a year. Over here it's green of course, but I'll happily eat other colours in other places. We're luckily on the fringe of an asparagus growing region, you don't have to travel far North and East to find it. I have tried to grow it but only succeeded in feeding molluscs. The idea of growing a bit of white and purple appeals a little, but it's so easy to get green asparagus here there's no point.

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Re: Seasonal treats

Postby miss mouse » Tue Sep 01, 2020 3:09 pm

Kacey wrote: My Nan always gave us a box of those jelly fruit things in the shape of orange and lemon slices,



New Berry Fruits, awful things, still going

http://www.newberryfruits.co.uk/where-to-buy/

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Re: Seasonal treats

Postby scullion » Tue Sep 01, 2020 3:10 pm

herbidacious wrote: Obviously you need to create your own traditions, but I have not quite managed this. I do like all the veg that go with a traditional Christmas dinner/Sunday/Easter roast but have yet to come up with a real treat main to go with these.

i had been making a tofu loaf which i invented, for our christmas dinner 'main', since the mid eighties (originally with home made tofu). it was baked in a rabbit jelly mould and when the children were young they would fight over the head or bum. as we've eaten christmas dinner round at our son's for the last couple of christmases i haven't made it - we have eaten indian. traditions change!

hate newberry fruits - and the orange and lemon slices.

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Re: Seasonal treats

Postby Stokey Sue » Tue Sep 01, 2020 3:56 pm

karadekoolaid wrote:THAT´S the stuff - Stone´s Ginger Wine!
And the dates in an oblong box, and bags of walnuts and hazelnuts.

The date packaging is called a glove box, not relevant to anything except I rather like it

We used to have Politi’s Crème de Menthe or Turkish Delight, cubes of soft jelly in a messy mixture of starch and powdered sugar, in a round tin that was always kept for storing buttons or nuts and bolts. Politi’s factory was in Stokey and I recently discovered that the reason it was so good was that Mr Politi was a Jew from Corfu and so couldn’t use gelatine, not kosher. It’s more difficult to make Turkish Delight without but a much better texture if you get it right, as he did.

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Re: Seasonal treats

Postby Earthmaiden » Tue Sep 01, 2020 4:05 pm

Red New Berry Fruits were my mother's favourite. Must say that I like them too and orange and lemon slices. MIL always used to get a Terry's Chocolate Orange (amongst a huge selection of other sweets) and open it with great ceremony during Christmas afternoon - bleugh.

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Re: Seasonal treats

Postby herbidacious » Tue Sep 01, 2020 4:12 pm

I bought some Newberry Fruits a while back (my father loved them) and they gave me a hypoglaecemic episode a few hours later. I don't dislike them though. One can buy some slightly less sweet pure fruit things in France which i quite like too. (Although too much pear involved for my liking.)
My father like rose and violet creams too.

I enjoyed the asparagus and mushroom seasons when visiting husband in Germany.

My father used to save sixpences and when they disappeared, five pences, in the little plastic pill jars his codeine phosphate came in. They were used to pay for the Christmas booze which usually involved a bottle of gin, a bottle of Martini, maybe a decent bottle of red - probably claret (instead of rancid homemade) and probably other things. Benedictine? Tastes were not refined chez nous. A Gin and It (I think dry vermouth though) was made at around 11am on Christmas day, and was slowly sipped until lunch time (in theory - sometimes more like mid-afternoon) Christmas dinner which seemed very decadent.
Babysham and Advocaat were in the cupboard in case my virtually tee-total mother wanted to try something.

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Re: Seasonal treats

Postby Gruney2 » Tue Sep 01, 2020 5:05 pm

scullion wrote:herbidacious wrote:
Obviously you need to create your own traditions, but I have not quite managed this. I do like all the veg that go with a traditional Christmas dinner/Sunday/Easter roast but have yet to come up with a real treat main to go with these.


My pescatarian daughter always stays for Christmas, and although we're pretty flexible about a lot of things, there are three things that are inviolable. Christmas Day morning: smoked salmon with blinis, and a bottle of Chablis, Christmas Dinner has to involve Savoy cabbage with juniper berries, and Boxing day has to have an apple Dutch Baby.

Thanks to Scully'a advice, this year may see the first of a new tradition - instead of messing about with quorn steaks and duck breasts, we'll be having a wodge of veggie haggis. Thanks again, Scully.

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