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Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby Earthmaiden » Sat Oct 10, 2020 12:24 pm

Fingertips PP, fingertips! Your hands should remain clean! :lol:.

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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby KeenCook2 » Sat Oct 10, 2020 12:53 pm

Pepper Pig wrote:
I can only do pastry in the Magimix however despite mum and aunt M being great pastry makers. I have very hot hands.


I don't even manage pastry in the magimix, PP, I think I need a lesson from you :lol:

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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby Suelle » Sat Oct 10, 2020 12:57 pm

Earthmaiden wrote:Fingertips PP, fingertips! Your hands should remain clean! :lol:.


Wouldn't hot hands mean hot fingers too? ;)
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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby Earthmaiden » Sat Oct 10, 2020 1:52 pm

Just out of interest I've just put my hand and then fingertips on my face. Fingertips are much cooler than I expected! Maybe I've got poor circulation :lol:.

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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby scullion » Sat Oct 10, 2020 2:09 pm

Suelle wrote:Wouldn't hot hands mean hot fingers too? ;)


hardly.
your hands have muscles in, which generate heat due to metabolism and a rich blood supply.
your fingers only have tendons and require a lesser blood supply for repair and renewal of skin, nerves, bone and other structures - plus they have a larger surface to body ratio and lose heat quicker - hence the reason fingers and toes are effected by frostbite quicker.
think - diabetes mellitus, hanson's disease, gangrene, raynaud's syndrome etc

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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby Renee » Sat Oct 10, 2020 3:22 pm

Earthmaiden wrote:Just out of interest I've just put my hand and then fingertips on my face. Fingertips are much cooler than I expected! Maybe I've got poor circulation :lol:.


Don't worry EM, my mother always had freezing cold fingers and lived to 101.

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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby Pepper Pig » Sat Oct 10, 2020 3:27 pm

Earthmaiden wrote:Just out of interest I've just put my hand and then fingertips on my face. Fingertips are much cooler than I expected! Maybe I've got poor circulation :lol:.


So have I. Mine are boiling . . . :lol: :oops:

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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby Earthmaiden » Sat Oct 10, 2020 5:03 pm

:lol: :lol:.

Perhaps your mother made lovely pastry Renee?

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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby dennispc » Sat Oct 10, 2020 6:05 pm

Quite a few, but fortunately am of an age when it doesn’t bother me anymore. I can type, but I would like to know how http://www.cornishpasties.org.uk/pasty-crimper.htm becomes this?

Not far from Amy is Ashburton Cookery School, one day, two day and five day patisserie courses, there are knife courses as well. Don’t seem to do a preserve course but there are plenty around, I would’ve thought.

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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby ZeroCook » Sat Oct 10, 2020 6:53 pm

.

Pastry is one of those things I usually do pretty well if I say so myself and always with a food processor which I highly recommend. I learned early on using the fingertip method but FPs beat the pyjamas off rubbing in by hand on all counts. But the main technique is not recipes and mixing but chilling/resting times, rolling out, and shaping/prepping in the baking pan.

Best puff pastry recipe & instruction/techique I've seen - note rolling-out techniques really well shown in the video
https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/puff-pastry

Wish I could type properly. Deliberately didn't learn so that I would never have to answer yes to "can you type?" when starting out in my line of work which could easily result in relegation to secretarial stereotyping and 'women's work' dead ends.


.

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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby Earthmaiden » Sat Oct 10, 2020 7:40 pm

Agree re the pastry ZeroCook.

Thought of another thing just now. Knowing how much salt to add to things to get them just right rather than tasting until you get addled and then getting it wrong!

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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby Stokey Sue » Sat Oct 10, 2020 9:17 pm

I think there are two tiers to the pastry thing
#1 is knowing how to make pastry = pie crust, and I’m firmly in the food processor camp here, it also has the advantage that it works better if you don’t take the butter out of the fridge in advance, which is handy; but some people find it tricky. I do also make decent flaky = rough puff as my show off for visiting foreigners used to be a deep steak & kidney pie with a flaky top

#2 is fancy pastry = patisserie, and I think some people on this thread have cracked #1 and are aspiring to #2

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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby scullion » Sun Oct 11, 2020 1:12 am

dennispc wrote:I can type, but I would like to know how http://www.cornishpasties.org.uk/pasty-crimper.htm becomes this?

am i right in thinking you would like to know how the link becomes embedded in the word

this?

i think the easiest way to see how it's done is to quote my post into a writing pane.

you will then see that the url brackets are round the word 'this' but in the first one you add = and then the url link you want to add - it should look like [url=http://www.aglioolioepeperoncino.com/p/2009-recipes.html]this[/url
(i have removed the final square bracket - ] - so the action is visible).

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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby dennispc » Sun Oct 11, 2020 10:27 am

:thumbsup Exactly that, Scullion. Thank you. I’ll have a go later.

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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby scullion » Sun Oct 11, 2020 11:08 am

no problem.

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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby Seatallan » Sun Oct 11, 2020 1:53 pm

I wish I could make better shortcrust pastry. I've never quite got the hang of it. I'm fine with flaky pastry and suet pastry but somehow my shortcrust is never the way I would like it to be.

Preserving is a different story. My father loved preserving and I think I must have absorbed a lot from him. I love preserving. :D

Not very good at poachy eggs either. Thankfully, Mr S was clearly born with a poachy egg knack so I leave poaching to him. I'm better than him at fried and scrambled however.
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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby Amyw » Sun Oct 11, 2020 2:24 pm

dennispc wrote:Quite a few, but fortunately am of an age when it doesn’t bother me anymore. I can type, but I would like to know how http://www.cornishpasties.org.uk/pasty-crimper.htm becomes this?

Not far from Amy is Ashburton Cookery School, one day, two day and five day patisserie courses, there are knife courses as well. Don’t seem to do a preserve course but there are plenty around, I would’ve thought.



Oooh really I don’t drive which might make it a bit of a trek but I’ll definitely look into it , something I would love to do

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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby Earthmaiden » Sun Oct 11, 2020 2:55 pm

Had a peep at the Ashburton courses as I too would love to do patisserie. The 5 day patisserie course looks quite good and covers quite a bit (though the techniques that I would like to master are more likely achieved on a 2 year full time course!). Of course, it's not cheap, especially if you'd need accommodation as well but about what you'd expect somewhere like that. It is tempting. Love the look of the street food course too. I know someone locally who has resumed classes at his cookery school and it seems to be do-able, following current Covid guidelines at least.

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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby Amyw » Sun Oct 11, 2020 3:03 pm

I am very tempted even if it’s just the one day course for patisserie and possibly book accommodation for the night before . I love cooking generally but am really beginning to get into the baking side more and it really relaxes me while also challenges me if that makes sense . Thanks Dennis it’s definitely one to mull over

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Re: Is There A Technique You Wish You'd Mastered?

Postby Renee » Fri Oct 16, 2020 11:57 pm

Earthmaiden wrote:
Perhaps your mother made lovely pastry Renee?


Yes, so far as I can remember Em! Twas a very long time ago!

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